School Improvement in Maryland

Public Release Item
Brief Constructed Response Item for Grade 3

Standard 2.0 Comprehension of Informational Text

Topic A. Comprehension of Informational Text

Indicator 4. Determine important ideas and messages in informational texts

Objective c. State and support main ideas and messages

Assessment limit: In the text or a portion of the text

Read this invitation to a special party. Then answer the question below.


Explain why the museum's show is called "Amazing Collections." In your response, use information from the invitation that helps to explain your ideas. Write your answer in the box below.


Sample Student Response #1

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #1: Rubric Score 0

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response is irrelevant to the question.


Sample Student Response #2

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #2: Rubric Score 0

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response is completely incorrect.


Sample Student Response #3

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #3: Rubric Score 1

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text. The student minimally explains why the museum’s show is called “Amazing Collections.” “…b/c it tall about kids that collect things…” and gives an example.


Sample Student Response #4

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #4: Rubric Score 1

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text. The student uses minimal information in explaining why the museum’s show is called “Amazing Collections” by listing things people collect. “People collect candy wrappers, napkins, stamps and bottons. They are all collections.”

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader fails to show a full understanding and simply repeats the words "amazing collections." However, the reader does cite appropriate text by listing the items that kids choose to collect. To improve this response, the reader should show a better understanding of what makes a collection amazing by stating, for example, that these collections are unusual, different, etc… An appropriate extension might be that those items being collected would not be important to most kids, but to these kids they are.


Sample Student Response #5

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #5: Rubric Score 2

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a general understanding of the text. The student partially explains why the museum’s show is named “Amazing Collections” by stating “…there are amazing collections from kids … unique in there own way … There are many different types of collections.”

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader states that the collections are amazing because they belong to kids, that the collections are unique as well as different. To improve this response, the reader should provide more specific text support by sharing exactly what kids are collecting. An appropriate extension might generate from the last sentence of the response. These "different" collections include items that are described as "world-class," "old and unusual," and in large amounts, "500 napkins." These collections are the best or the top.


Sample Student Response #6

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #6: Rubric Score 2

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a general understanding of the text. The student uses text-relevant information to explain why the museum’s show’s name is “Amazing Collections” by stating “…that people are collecting very unusual (things) …like a girl collecting paper napkins…candy wrappers…are amazing to see.” The student also mentions the things are from other countries.


Sample Student Response #7

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #7: Rubric Score 3

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text. The student explains and clarifies why the museum’s show is called “Amazing Collections” by giving several extensions: “…people collect stuff that other people thinks is trash.” The student gives examples of candy wrappers and shoelaces, and wraps up his answer with saying “…one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.”

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader cites "that people collect stuff that other people thinks is trash" and lists specifically candy wrappers and shoelaces, which most people would believe are trash. At the conclusion the reader clarifies with a commonly known thought that "one man's trash is another man's treasure." To improve this response, the reader might form a better connection between the first sentence and how this is amazing. A simple statement that these kids choose to save and treasure what most others would discard is amazing, astonishing, surprising, etc…would form that connection.


Sample Student Response #8

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #8: Rubric Score 3

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text. The student effectively uses text-relevant information to explain why the museum’s show is called “Amazing Collections” by clarifying that “… (the) collections are unique.” and then stating that a collection of 500 napkins is unique “…because barely anyone has a collection of paper napkins.” The student then sums up the answer with a quote from the text that clarifies that there will be more “unique Collections.”


Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Rubric

Print: Scoring Rubric

Score 3

The response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text.

  • Addresses the demands of the question
  • Effectively uses text-relevant1 information to clarify or extend understanding

Score 2

The response demonstrates a general understanding of the text.

  • Partially addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses text-relevant1 information to show understanding

Score 1

The response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text.

  • Minimally addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses minimal information to show some understanding of the text in relation to the question

Score 0

The response is completely incorrect, irrelevant to the question, or missing.2

Note 1:

Text-relevant: This information may or may not be an exact copy (quote) of the text but is clearly related to the text and often shows an analysis and/or interpretation of important ideas. Students may incorporate information to show connections to relevant prior experience as appropriate.

Note 2:

An exact copy (quote) or paraphrase of the question that provides no new relevant information will receive a score of "0".

Rubric Document Date: June 2003

/share/rubrics/msa/reading/xml/bcr.xml
/toolkit/vsc/assessment_items/msa_ela_3_052.xml