School Improvement in Maryland

Public Release Item
Brief Constructed Response Item for Grade 3

Standard 2.0 Comprehension of Informational Text

Topic A. Comprehension of Informational Text

Indicator 4. Determine important ideas and messages in informational texts

Objective g. Draw conclusions and inferences and make generalizations and predictions from text

Assessment limit: From the text or a portion of the text

Read this invitation to a special party. Then answer the question below.


After reading this invitation, what can you conclude about starting a collection? In your response, use information from the invitation that helps to explain your conclusion. Write your answer in the box below.


Sample Student Response #1

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #1: Rubric Score 0

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response is completely incorrect.


Sample Student Response #2

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #2: Rubric Score 0

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response is irrelevant to the question.


Sample Student Response #3

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #3: Rubric Score 1

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text. The student minimally explains what the information in the invitation shows about starting a collection by stating the “story” would let you “think about ideas you want (about collecting).”


Sample Student Response #4

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #4: Rubric Score 1

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text. The student minimally explains what the information in the invitation shows about starting a collection by stating “thay want to teach kids how to learn the true meaning of collecting stuff.”

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader answers “thay want to teach kids how to learn the true meaning of collecting stuff.” To improve this response, the reader should provide text support for wanting to teach about collecting: how kids start the process, what kids collect… To further clarify the response, the reader might focus on the words “true meaning of collecting” and explain options for that idea. For example, the true meaning might simply be what is important to an individual.


Sample Student Response #5

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #5: Rubric Score 2

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a general understanding of the text. The student uses text-relevant information to explain what information in the invitation shows about starting a collection: “…the hosts…can help you make a collection. You might get ideas from other people so that you can make a collection…”

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader concludes “the hosts of the party can help you make a collection” and then elaborates that ideas may come from other people to help you begin a collection. To improve this response, the reader could bolster support by offering specific ideas from the text like the napkin or candy wrapper collections. To extent this idea, the reader might select an item from text like shoelaces and explain why they might be significant to a collector.


Sample Student Response #6

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #6: Rubric Score 2

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a general understanding of the text. The student uses text-relevant information to explain what information in the invitation shows about starting a collection by stating “…it gives some examples of how Michelle and Paul got their collections started…” and mentions two other collectors and their collections.


Sample Student Response #7

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #7: Rubric Score 3

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text. The student effectively uses text-relevant information to explain what information in the invitation shows about starting a collection. The student clarifies the response by giving a brief synopsis of how Paul and Michelle started their collections by paraphrasing the two stories told in the graphics of the candy wrapper and napkin.

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader concludes that the invitation helps you know how to begin a collection and then supports and clarifies the response by summarizing the reasons for beginning two different collections in the invitation. To improve this response, the reader might further clarify that the two cited collections were started from two different impulses: the candy wrappers from attraction and the napkins from a situation.


Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Rubric

Print: Scoring Rubric

Score 3

The response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text.

  • Addresses the demands of the question
  • Effectively uses text-relevant1 information to clarify or extend understanding

Score 2

The response demonstrates a general understanding of the text.

  • Partially addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses text-relevant1 information to show understanding

Score 1

The response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text.

  • Minimally addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses minimal information to show some understanding of the text in relation to the question

Score 0

The response is completely incorrect, irrelevant to the question, or missing.2

Note 1:

Text-relevant: This information may or may not be an exact copy (quote) of the text but is clearly related to the text and often shows an analysis and/or interpretation of important ideas. Students may incorporate information to show connections to relevant prior experience as appropriate.

Note 2:

An exact copy (quote) or paraphrase of the question that provides no new relevant information will receive a score of "0".

Rubric Document Date: June 2003

/share/rubrics/msa/reading/xml/bcr.xml
/toolkit/vsc/assessment_items/msa_ela_3_055.xml